Posts tagged: Patrick Quinn

Final Election Results

Written by David E. Smith
The Illinois State Board of Elections recently released the certified election results.  Here are the numbers:

  
  
AttorneyGeneralRace 
Governor-elect Bruce Rauner (R) won a slim majority of the total votes and by 142,284 votes over incumbent Patrick Quinn (D).  Voter turnout was 49 percent, and compared to the 2010 gubernatorial election was down two percent, or 112,353 less voters in the 2014 election.

Incumbent Democratic Attorney General Lisa Madigan won decisively with 59 percent of the total vote, beating Republican challenger Paul Schimpf who received little support from the Republican establishment in Illinois.
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Nine Reasons to Reject Equal Rights Amendment

Nine Reasons to Reject Equal Rights Amendment

Written by Kathy Valente

Last week the Illinois Senate voted 39 to 11 to pass SJRCA 75, the dangerous Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), the effort to amend the U.S. Constitution to say: “Equality of rights under law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or any State on account of sex.”

This legislation is now in the Illinois House for consideration and debate.  State Representative Lou Lang (D-Skokie) is the chief sponsor.  

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Quinn: Make the Tax Increase Permanent or the Disabled & Dying Get It

Written By Dan Proft

On Wednesday, Governor Pat Quinn dressed up the demands of a hostage-taker into a state budget address—again.

In advance of the permanently temporary personal and corporate income tax increases he imposed on Illinois in 2011, Quinn argued that without the tax increases, social service providers would suffer.

In fact, he would see to it that they did.

Quinn’s less than subtle message to the human services community was that if they wanted to avoid seeing the invoices they submitted to the state for services rendered put into the permanently permanent pay-no-mind bin in the Governor’s office they best fall in line.

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Modified by Matthew Medlen.com